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Not So Trivial Pursuit of the Perfect Novel: Colloquialism and Place

Welcome minions! I’m finally adding another installment to this never-ending blog series. I find myself looking forward to these posts more and more because it gives me a chance to truly reflect on what kind of piece I’m developing and to share what I’ve learned along the way.

Onto the topic at hand—where is my story going? No, I’m not talking about the plot or the character’s movements from room to room. I’m talking about the where. The setting. The place. Whatever you call it, it’s the magic behind the scenes or a character all its own. In the dozens of writing workshops and seminars I’ve attended, place isn’t something you just throw in or use without proper consideration.

Not utilizing the full potential of place is as much of a writing crime as too many adverbs. This may not be a carved-in-stone rule of writing, but hell what rule is carved in stone? Mostly, I just want to express how underutilized place is in a ton of commercial writing. When I say commercial writing, I mean books that are made with the intention of being sold or published on the commercial market i.e. Amazon, Createspace, Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Scribd etc. Whether it costs money to read your book or not, never ever forget about place. It represents the where in the all-important foundation of your story (simplified: who, what, when, where, why).

If you simply choose New York for your  alien story because it’s easy—think again! Place can ground readers in history like Anglo Saxon Britain or allow the reader an escape to a faraway galaxy uncharted by humanity. I, for one, have fallen prey to laziness in this department for a few of my unfinished pieces that I dare not share with the world yet. This is especially true for my earlier drafts of Dollhouse Daughter, which was initially set in London during the late 1700’s. Without knowing it, I set myself up for disaster.

I knew nothing about the 1700’s much less London in that period. It was after two pages that I made the switch to a modern London with a few chapters based in modern U.S. The change in period was a fantastic relief because it made my job as the writer so much easier, but I unknowingly still struggled with place. My manuscript, still untitled at that time, had grown to a whopping six chapters before my laziness caught up with me. Eventually, my Irish mentor suggested I write what I know because in the chapters I’d written there was little to nothing about British culture. At that moment, I realized the right place for my story wasn’t in London; it was a town called Warrenton, Georgia.

Step 1–to finding the true place for your story is research. A normal part of every story has at least some research. Outside of realm of “write what you know”, we wordsmiths crawl onto the world wide web searching for delectable bits of information. Now that I’ve found the right setting for Cassie’s story, I had to figure out what it meant to live in the deep South. Being a native Northerner, I had quite the task ahead of me, but research is only useful if you…well, if you use it. So, I studied youtube videos, pictures, and articles in hopes that I could catch the essence of Warrenton. But I couldn’t research too much. I had to put a limit on how much I perused because I’m not writing an essay of the culture of the deep South. I only need to learn enough to keep my story moving. And I hope others can appreciate place a little more after sharing the fundamentals I used in my own novel.

Step 2–Dialect is both the easiest and hardest part of showing place because it can be simple for someone to write a dialect they know, and so easy to create stereotypes or bog the story down with unintelligible dialogue.  Mark Twain is by far the best and most controversial example of how dialect can transform a simple novel ( The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) to a piece of timeless literature. He had a magic formula that made his writing seem realistic without distracting from the story. So my challenge was not only to include accurate, exciting Southern dialect to give the right characters flavor, but my Haitian Kreyòl had to be just as present if I wanted to truly represent the vodou of  Haiti. It was even more thrilling to know that my past French classes were put to good use since it was a major component in the construction of Kreyòl as a language.  Below are just some examples of my own use of dialect in Dollhouse Daughter:

Southern:

“Burn my biscuits, that woman’s nose is up so high in the clouds she could drown in a rainstorm,” Betty said.

“And just to ruffle my feathers, that foul woman had the au-da-city to tell me that Sandy should be having little Samantha baptized in a Lutheran church instead of St. John’s.”

Oh, honey,” Jessica said, flashing her too-bright teeth. “It’s all Coke in Georgia. They mustn’t teach common sense in them Northern schools.”

Haitian:

“No, pitit mwen, it will not hurt.”

“Papi, please hear me.Your LeeLee needs guidance.”

“Bonjou, pitit Brigitte,” he bellowed, his baritone voice thunderous even against the sound of the drums. “You have come to us humble vodouisants on a special evening. Tonight we celebrate the changing of the moon by meeting Mambo Azalee’s nouvo zanmi, Cassandra from the North.”

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Let me know what you think and especially if anything screams out as being inaccurate or unrealistic because I want to make it the best it possibly can be. The next installation of N.S.T.P.P.N. will be coming up shortly with an emphasis still heavily devoted to place. It should be posted within the next few days, so don’t forget to check back. And as always Happy Reading and Writing!

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Place is Everywhere, Captain Obvious!

As strange as it seems, place keeps coming back and slapping me in the face. “I’m everywhere,” it says. “Use me!” And so when I venture to the great Emerald Isle, I will embark on a writing journey completely focused…on place.

How can someone not write about this??

Located hundreds of miles from my tiny apartment is the brilliant city of Dublin where I will learn how the wonderful country of Ireland feels, smells, and sounds.  Place allows everything in a story to prosper if the writer lets it. Too often stories are set in a wonderful place, and the writer kills it before it can build a life of its own. It is in other stories that place becomes the center of the characters’ lives and without it the story falls a part. Ireland brings me an opportunity to experience the world as it was before cell phones, electricity, and even indoor plumbing.

It is the magic of the land that I hope to soak in and apply to my writing. A chance to breath in the history and the myth of the ancient world.  After starting the Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley, the mystical elements of the land seem into my sub-conscious and beg of me to search for faeries and leprechauns on my trip. I have a goal to wander the wilderness of Ireland in search for the Otherworld, but perhaps that will have to come in my dreams or my writing. Regardless, a trip to this magical place has inspired an idea of epic proportion, which I hope will blossom on my journey to Dublin.

Instead of forests and streams, my trip will be full of the Dublin nightlife, which will hopefully still hold the magic of Ireland!

What magical place have you always dreamed of traveling to and writing about? Share your thoughts here!

Happy reading and writing!!

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Scary Setting: Why They Were Picked For Stories?

We all know why the phrase “on a dark and stormy night” brings on a wave of chills and terror when read.  Yet, it is where you are on that stormy night that truly turns a story into the horrifying one the author’s nutty brain imagined.

The mystery and suspense thrive on the creation of a spooky setting

The setting may be just part of the background for some writers. I have found the more I read (as a writer), the more important place becomes to the story. It’s not only the playing board on which the writer sets his/her characters, but it can bring the story to life for the reader. Besides, do you think if a horror story were set in a different place, the story would really stay the same? HELL NO!

Would The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde be the same outside of London? Or how about Dracula and Transylvania? None of these classics would hold the same power if they weren’t set in these eerie places with descriptions to match. There are a few familiar examples to follow to help explain my point. Anne Rice’s Interview with a Vampire would feel out of place without New Orleans casting its old world mysticism onto the modern story. Most of Stephen King’s novels take place in a fake town in Maine, allowing him to create the most fantastic horror stories of our time. Finally, I Am Legend by Richard Matheson is set in the ruins of Los Angeles leaving its main character alone with throngs of mutated humans that once populated the luxurious city.

At times, the writer will focus too much on the plot or characters to notice what makes good horror writing truly believable, but that is where the terrifying bumps in the night live. I found the inspiration for my next story not in a person or idea, but in a place.  About a ten minute drive from home, sits several new developments with pretty, new houses. When I say several I mean hundreds of brand-new, huge mansion-sized houses in the forests of Western Pennsylvania–all empty. There are one or two occupied houses in each development and the rest…Well, the rest are as deserted as a Western ghost town (also another great location).

Now, I may not be an economist or real estate agent. However, building hundreds of $400,000 homes in an unlikely real estate location strikes me as odd. So odd that it becomes spine-tingling creepy if you visit them at night.  My story does not have a spooky city, but a spooky house. It may seem cliche or lame, but it is the perfect place to write my new science fiction horror.

What are your favorite scary settings in novels and if you’re currently writing a horror, why did you choose the setting you did?

Happy reading and writing!!

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